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National Archives confirm Declaration of Independence, Constitution and Bill of Rights safe after D.C. flooding

Dangerous flash floods have rocked the Washington, D.C. area on Monday, but the nation’s founding documents are safe, according to The National Archives.

The historic building, which contains significant artifacts including the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and the Bill of Rights, announced it closed due to electrical outrages on Monday amid the chaotic flooding. More than six inches of rain pounded parts of the D.C. area in just a two-hour time span earlier in the day.

The National Archives confirmed that the historical objects it holds were still intact, and shed some light on their safety procedures in the process.

“The Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and the Bill of Rights–along with all of the permanently valuable records stored in the building–are safe and not in any danger,” the statement read.

“All safety emergency equipment is up and working. Crews are on site working to restore the main power vault which was flooded via groundwater infiltration. The building’s flood walls deployed and worked,” it continued.

Shocking images posted to social media showed the terrifying reality of the flash floods in the area, as some drivers became stuck in the high waters and were forced to swim to safety or stand on top of their cars until help arrived.

There was substantial flooding surrounding The National Archives, making the streets inaccessible but not reaching the building’s stone staircase or pillars.

In response to the National Archives’ statement on Twitter, many were quick to make jokes about the movie “National Treasure,” in which Nicolas Cage steals the Declaration of Independence from the Archives.

“The moment you think it’s safe… that’s when Nic Cage will strike,” one user wrote, referencing the enigmatic star’s “National Treasure” franchise.

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