Dictionary : Vocabulary.com

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featured word

fellowship

A grant given by a university or foundation to a scholar for research or study is a fellowship. If you get a fellowship to do research on insects, it might bug your colleagues who didn’t get one.

Use fellowship to refer to someone’s company or companionship. Your grandmother might prefer the fellowship of people her own age, since they remember the same historic events as she does and know the same songs. A fellowship is also a community of people who share common beliefs or interests. A fellowship of knitters might meet weekly at a cafe in your town to exchange ideas and knit together.

Choose your words

Caught between words? Learn how to make the right choice.

flair/
flare

Flair is a talent for something, like what the pro-wrestler Nature Boy Ric Flair had back in the day. Flare is on a candle or the shape of bell-bottoms that kids rocked back in the heyday of wrastlin’.
read more…

paradox/
oxymoron

A paradox is a logical puzzle that seems to contradict itself. No it isn’t. Actually, it is. An oxymoron is a figure of speech — words that seem to cancel each other out, like “working vacation” or “instant classic.”
read more…

breach/
breech

If you break a contract, it’s a breach. If you’re talking about pantaloons, guns, or feet-first babies, use breech with a double “e.”
read more…

connotation/
denotation

A connotation is the feeling a word invokes. But take note! A denotation is what the word literally says. If these words were on a trip, connotation would be the baggage, and denotation would be the traveler. read more…

eminent/
imminent/
immanent

No, it’s not the name of the latest rapper from Detroit, but it could describe one — eminent describes anyone who’s famous. Imminent refers to something about to happen. And anything immanent (with an “a” in there) is inherent, like that good attitude you were born with. read more…

gig/
jig

Gig with a hard “g” is a job. Jig, on the other hand, is a dance. The kind a band might do when they land a gig headlining Madison Square Garden. read more…

See all Choose Your Words articles »

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